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On 5/7/2018 at 6:18 AM, kayc said:

I can't wait until you have time to start painting again, it seems to bring an inner release to you, a beauty of it's own.

Yeah...me too. I had gotten so flattened my synesthesia disappeared - where I sense these three-dimensional line when I listen to or think about music. But just the other day I found my hands dancing around to music, and this morning I had a stray random thought about painting. I was too busy to think about it much, much less do anything about it, but it was nice to get some sense that the artist I am is still there. I am getting a lot of work lined up for next year, though. In fact, I think I have found more than I can realistically do, and I have to figure out what is reasonable so that I don't make myself crazy with too much work and too much stress.

That's great that you are enjoying some beauty with Arlie - he sounds like a splendid dog...

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9 hours ago, Clematis said:

But just the other day I found my hands dancing around to music, and this morning I had a stray random thought about painting.

The important thing is it's coming to you again, and I really think seeing an end in sight to this job has brought that on!  When things slow down this summer you'll be able to put some music and painting into action.

Yes, Arlie is a wonderful wonderful dog, I am so glad I have him in my life!  Normally I'm up at 4 am but I was awake from midnight to 3:30 am last night.  When I woke up it was 6:30 am!  I never sleep that late!  Arlie had undoubtedly been awake for a long time, it was past his breakfast time, but he let me sleep in, waiting for my breathing pattern to change and knew I was awake before he presented himself so I could let him outside to do his business.  He's so thoughtful, he really is!  Is it any wonder I adore this "roommate" of mine?!  :)

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Yeah...the fuzzy roommates are the best! 

Eight more days of work - Mon Tues Thurs Fri for two weeks. Nest week will be jam-packed with meetings and work, and the last week I will be tying up loose ends and packing up loose ends. 

I am trying to figure out what to do about next year. I would really like to do as much as work as I can with the online company and that means being as available as possible. That would mean saying no to MG, my colleague of six years to his offer of two days per week in Winslow. I have one day a week set up in Prescott with a new person, and am very excited about that, because going to Prescott means I can go to Trader Joes and a real art store, as well as grab a fish taco while there. If I had the one day in Prescott and two days in Winslow, both with a long drive, I would be at about full time with those three 12+ hour days. Not much time to develop a caseload with the online company. They say you start with something and then build on. If I don't accept the two days in Winslow, it could be rather sketchy for awhile but I would probably end up with something that worked better for me. Driving to Winslow means about an hour each way of driving on a freeway in heavy traffic with big trucks and I HATE that! Also, if I took the day in Prescott and the two days in Winslow I would be still trying to make a go at working with the online company, and would probably have more work than I could do well at. And I wouldn't have any time to have a life of my own. That doesn't seem good. But if I don't take the two days in Winslow, I could end up a little short on work, but would probably be able to fill it in with bits and pieces of things that are closer to home...

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You have some hard decisions to make but you are weighing the pros and cons and I believe you will arrive at the decision that is best for you.  Sometimes it's hard knowing what to do going in. Eight more days to work, sounds like countdown has begun!

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Follow what gives you Peace.  Building your own clientele usually takes longer than we plan.  You know your finances and also allow for MARGIN in your life.  Busyness and lots of activity does not equal productivity.  You know all of this.  I find that when I focus more on PEACE then I can find the direct path through the work and life challenges.  I definitely relate. I have been operating my own businesses for over twenty-five years and still there are changes that are challenging and can get my eyes off the goal.  I'm going through that now.  So I review my plans, see what has changed in the marketplace and adapt my plans to optimize my business.  If I let my fears overtake me, I will freeze, slow down, or just stop.  It is okay to stop temporarily.  Just don't let that be a permanent condition.

The secret to life when we get knocked down is to get up, dust ourselves off, evaluate what happened, what can we learn from this, and then move forward.  Follow PEACE and you will find your PATH. - Shalom

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On 5/13/2018 at 5:09 PM, iPraiseHim said:

If I let my fears overtake me, I will freeze, slow down, or just stop. 

Yeah, I know what you mean. I am afraid that I may not have enough work if I don't accept the two days a week of work in Winslow. I really really do not want to drive to Winslow; it's about two hours each way that I would not be compensated for, and half of it is on a freeway with big trucks. I hate that kind of driving. In addition to the safety risks, and wear and tear on my old cars, it means time sitting, less time to exercise, and other health risks. I think part of my reluctance to refuse those two days is that it would be working for a guy I worked with before and that really saved me when I thought I was in free fall in between jobs seven years ago. I hate to say no to him.

I am working on getting cross-licensed in Michigan and Georgia as a counselor and in California as a school psychologist, in addition to my licensure in AZ in both of these areas. It seems like it would be better to work hard at that, since it will likely lead to what I really want - securing more work with the online company. I have generally not operated out of fear in my life and it seems rather unlike me to just give up and accept what I know I don't want out of fear. If it really does turn out badly and I don't get enough work, I can always get work at an agency as a psychotherapist. There is an agency in Cottonwood and one in Flagstaff. The latter is a little longer drive, but I know the executive director and every time I see him he asks me if I'll come work for him...

I just watched the movie "The Eagle Huntress" and I felt a lot of grief for the death of my dad, but also a lot of gratitude for what he gave me in the way of mentoring, guidance, support, friendship, and ultimately partnership, as I developed my skills and my career over the years. A decade ago, he watched me go through an ordeal in another school district that was similar to what I have endured this past year. He said that he was lucky and never had to face that kind of arbitrary abuse at work or even the threat of losing his job because of something crazy like a supervisor's insecurity. He was smart, he worked hard, he did a good job in his professional work, and he was rewarded for it by reasonable financial compensation and security in his career. I have been attacked for my strengths, and vilified for having the intelligence and skills that make me excel at my work. It's hard to remember that is not my fault.

I miss my dad...but I hear him talking me through this.

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16 hours ago, Clematis said:

I think part of my reluctance to refuse those two days is that it would be working for a guy I worked with before and that really saved me when I thought I was in free fall in between jobs seven years ago. I hate to say no to him.

Laura, you need to do what is best for YOU.  Don't worry about him, he will find someone to do the job.  You listed several reasons why you don't want to drive so far to this job, all of them valid reasons.  I have a car with 193,000 miles on it and I think I quit commuting just in the nick of time, otherwise I would have been looking at having to buy a new car.  That would have cut way into what I was earning and on top of it I'd have been paying taxes on $ I wouldn't get to keep, but would be expending in order to earn $!  A very real consideration.  Most of the miles on my car were from my commuting to work 110 miles/day.  Your driving four hours a day, two days a week, would pile on the miles.  When you do the math, only you can decide if you and your car can afford this.

Is there another part time job you could do locally, even if something different (music gig?) to bring in the bit extra $ you need to make ends meet?

 

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14 hours ago, kayc said:

Is there another part time job you could do locally, even if something different (music gig?) to bring in the bit extra $ you need to make ends meet?

Yes, I could work as a psychotherapist for the guidance center in Cottonwood or Flagstaff. The executive director of the Flagstaff Guidance Center really wants me to work for him...

And...check this out. I spent a huge chunk of time over the weekend researching all of the states in the country and what one needs to do to be cross-licensed. The online company had sent me several suggestions for states to get cross-licensed in, but they seemed to all have something I don't have and can't really get, like a degree from a school that was NASP-approved while attending (my school got this later). I made up a spreadsheet with information I got from NASP online. I then checked this state by state by looking at each state's website, and sorted it all out into columns. They really appreciated getting all this data and gave me two suggestions from my short list. One of them is Oregon! Oregon is actually one of the easier states to get a reciprocity license, and I jumped right on it, especially since the woman from the company told me that "Oregon is one of our high needs states". So, I'll be a licensed school psychologist in Oregon - what do you think about that? Cool, huh?

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Two days before Thanksgiving I felt strongly compelled to tag along with my friend Gloria, a barber, to visit Hermon, the barber who opened, owned and operated the local barber shop for decades, and also gave Gloria her start as a barber. Hermon's daughter and caretaker had just died and the family was in free fall, since his other children live hours away and Hermon has dementia from Alzheimer's. My sudden appearance mystified his family but delighted Hermon. Since then I have coordinated services for Hermon and been "eyes and ears" for his son in our joint effort to help Hermon to stay in his home as long as possible. I call Hermon at least six times a day, visit him frequently, keep a tight loop of communication between everyone, and take Hermon out in the community, which is the delight of his life. He frequently sees people who knew him for many years, and he is a delight even to people who are new to him. Now strangers, because the man never knew a stranger and people seem to sense that about him.

When I first approached Hermon in his home that day, I asked him how he was doing and he said, "Not so good", and fell into my arms crying. After a minute he pulled back, and as an introduction I showed him a photo of my dad and he hugged me again, crying even harder and telling me that he remembered my dad well and really missed him. In the past few days Hermon has had some remarkably lucid times, and has related some things to me about my father that really put things into perspective. He told me that when I was in his home that first day and he realized that I was the daughter of his beloved former customer Charlie, he was thrilled I was there because he knew how much my dad had treasured me. Last night Hermon was relating to me what he recalled about my dad's talking to him over the years about me. Hermon was telling me not so much any details, but more the gist, the essence, and the long term constancy of what my father had said to him. Hermon concluded this by telling me, "you really were his entire world".

Hermon will be 90 in August, and he barbered until about three years ago, working in his own shop here for the last 35 or so years. When he retired, he was the oldest, longest continually working barber in the state of AZ, having barbered for 67 years. He cut my dad's hair for ten years, and although Hermon always says to me and others that he and my dad were real good friends, I have heard no details anywhere that they ever got together outside of the barber shop. Hermon's son has told me that his dad "was not the type of person" to get together with people anywhere outside of work. I have wondered what this means - how Hermon was so connected to my dad and what that might have meant to my dad. Hermon inadvertently explained this himself, telling me, "barbering is a very personal relationship and a strong bond develops over the years because of the communication that takes place". My dad said very little about Hermon, but the truth is that my father was not a talker and said very little in general at home. I always assumed he didn't talk much to others either, but that may not be true. He has been more communicative with me since his death than he ever was before, and I am getting to know him more and more after his death. How and why that is - well that is a mystery!

Anyway, it seems very clear to me now that my dad sent me over to Hermon's house with Gloria that day, and seemed to believe that once I got there I would see what I needed to do and do it. I have done so in spite of the challenges of many kinds. Caring for Hermon is sometimes it is an honor, sometimes an aggravation, and usually a pleasure, but it has never felt like a choice. He is not my father but he is somehow family - family that my father arranged after his death.

I miss my dad every day and I feel lost here surrounded by his possessions and faced with his physical absence. I struggle every day to find meaning in all of this, mostly how it is that I didn't really understand so much of the essence of him or his history until he was no longer living. I wish he could have explained so many things to me while he was alive, rather than my having to extrapolate if after his death. But like him, I am a relentless seeker of truth and understanding, and he was not much of a talker. I suppose it is what it is...

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Laura,

I relate well what you share. My father is a mystery in many respects.  His personality has changed, softened, and become more revealing after my wife died.  Maybe it is because I have spent more time with him and just learned to accept him as he is.  His health and short term memory is deteriorating. 

The sibling rivalry with my sister is driving a wedge between us.  Like your family story, there is so much family history, passive aggressive actions with my Mom that has had repercussions throughout my family.  Apparently, I have been cut out of the will yet expected to pretend everything is fine and we have one happy loving family.  My sister has the power of attorney and medical power of attorney so I really have no input.  Yet I'm expected to drop business anytime my sister calls to ask for help.  We have had many discussions.  She only sees her point of view.

My sister has called another "FAMILY gathering" (Just her, me, her husband, and DAD for a family picnic).  I really don't want to go but have decided to attend for the sake of my father. His health is declining.  He just came home from a month in the hospital and nursing convalescent care.

Laura, I don't know why life turns out the way it does.  Yet I know there is some meaning and purpose to it all.  I still miss my beloved wife, Rose Anne, everyday.  Continue to listen and search out the TRUTH, and you will find it.  I do know I am supposed to live life to the fullest each day, as best as I can.  Always pursuing the greatest Truth and Love. - Shalom   

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Laura,

It's good to hear from you again.  How fortunate that Hermon has you in his time of need!  One of the biggest problems we face in America is how isolated our elderly people are.  Children are scattered across the country and parents are left alone to deal with things when they no longer can.

Wondering how your job search has been going, what you have decided about this coming school year.  Have you found any time for painting?  How is Lena?

My own Kitty is aging quickly.  She's hard of hearing so I either have to turn on a light when I walk across a room or make more noise than just footsteps so she knows I'm coming and moves out of the way.  She's lost weight and not eating much, and developed a lot of cysts this year.  But that she's in as good health as she is at 23 thoroughly amazes me.  I know she isn't long for this world.  She's always been a rather demanding cranky cat, but lately she's enjoyed laying on the couch with me in the evening while I rub her belly and under her chin, and sometimes she even purrs.  It's making me nervous that soon I will lose her and once again being hurtled into this world of grief.  Ahh the price of loving.

George,

I can relate.  My mom left everything to my brother, nothing to us girls.  It's as if we didn't count, and that hurt.  Not that there was a whole lot left after her care in a dementia care center, but it's the principle.  I don't understand how she could do that.  We were always there for her.  Paying her heat bill (oil...$450/month).  We tried to get her to move into something smaller, she refused.  She never listened to any of us.  We had to get a court order for a medical evaluation, and it took a year to do so.  She was in stage 4 dementia and they ordered her into 24/7 lock down.  They required two people be present to get her into her wheelchair, bed, etc.  even though she was only about 70 lbs by that time.  Some things we'll never understand, and our parent's decisions is one of them.  She made her will years ago so I can't blame dementia.  Her own parents and my dad's left everything evenly split between their children.  It's not even about $ or the stuff, it's the idea behind it that we didn't matter.  That hurt.

I guess all we can do is take our hurt to the Lord.  Life isn't fair, we've already learned that.  We learned that when our spouses died and others lived.  Some things we won't understand until we get to heaven and I guess then it'll all be a moot point.  The past will be past, we'll be relishing in what IS, and not lamenting what happened before.  We'll let go of the wrongs,we'll be caught up in this wonderful place called heaven that I can't even conceive of.  I'm glad I have my faith, I don't know how I'd live without it.

Sometimes I wish you lived away from the drama, further from your sister, but then again, you'd be further from your dad too, and every day with him still in it is a blessing.  I know.  I miss my mom, even as difficult as she was, I still miss her.  When she was further into her dementia, she was actually easier, nicer, sweet.  God's grace for that was how she went out, the way we could remember her, it was a little softer than the rest of her life.  I realize not all dementia patients go that way, we were fortunate.  I miss visiting her, I miss taking her out.

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