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MartyT

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ONLINE SUPPORT GROUP WITH DR. TERRI DANIEL

Managing Loss and Grief

During the Holiday Season

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If you are mourning the death of a loved one or a loss of any kind, including divorce, job loss, pet loss, health loss, or any major life transition, this annual group/workshop provides a rare interactive learning and healing experience facilitated by a professional grief counselor.

 

The two sessions (Nov. 20 and Dec. 4) are based on the practices in Dr. Daniel's Grief as a Mysical Journey workshops. In addition to open discussion and sharing, each meeting will end with a therapeutic process, such as a guided meditation, mapping exercise or creative ceremony for moving the “stuck” energy of grief out of our bodies and into a more spacious, more ventilated emotional landscape.

 

TWO-SESSIONS  

Nov. 20 | Dec. 4

4:00 - 5:30 PM Pacific Time

DETAILS HERE
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Thanks for this Marty.

I went to the site and saw there was a short video where Terri discusses the Dual Process Model for working through grief. I like this approach to grief and can relate to it more than the Kübler-Ross model, which I feel is outdated as it was based on her work with terminally ill patients. To me, the Kübler-Ross model fails to fully explain or embrace the more complex emotions people experience with a death. 

I've seen 2 separate grief therapists over the last 2 years and both discussed/used the Dual Process Model of Grief in my sessions. One thing I like about the Dual Process Model is that it’s okay to experience grief in doses. Everyone is different when it comes to processing their grief so this may not align with everyone. To each his own I guess.

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3 hours ago, Boho-Soul said:

the Kübler-Ross model fails to fully explain or embrace the more complex emotions people experience with a death. 

The problem is that, although it is based on a ground-breaking book that was published in 1969 (over a half-century ago!) this model has appeared so often in the mainstream media that it's still regarded by many as gospel (even by some mental health professionals who should know better) ~ but this is NOT the model adherred to by experts in the practice of thanatology (a scientific discipline that examines death from many perspectives, including physical, ethical, spiritual, medical, sociological, and psychological). We have studied and learned so much more about grief and bereavement in the last 50 years, and I can assure you that qualified practitioners in the field do not subscribe to the stages models of grief. See Taking A Look At The Stages of Grief (including the related resources listed at the base). As you wisely observe, the Dual Process Model is the one that makes the most sense to most practitioners (and to those of us who are coping with loss) ~ along with William Worden's Tasks of Mourning model. ❤️

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Yes! The 5 Stages of Grief debunked  (links contained within are broken/missing now)

The Five Stages of Grief debunked

 

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On 11/10/2022 at 1:14 PM, MartyT said:

We have studied and learned so much more about grief and bereavement in the last 50 years, and I can assure you that qualified practitioners in the field do not subscribe to the stages models of grief.

Continued learning and understanding around grief and bereavement is so important. I just read and article and found this statement which was refreshing to read.

In her later years, Kubler-Ross wrote that she regretted writing the stages the way that she did, that people mistook them as being both linear and universal. Based on what she observed while working with patients given terminal diagnoses, Kubler-Ross identified five ''common' experiences, not five ''required' experiences. Her stages applied to the dying were meant to normalize and validate what someone might experience in the swirl of insanity that is loss, death and grief bring.

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Elisabeth was a giant in her day. I had the privilege of seeing and hearing her in person at Ferris State University when I was on the faculty there, way back in 1969. She brought death and dying out of the darkness and into the light, and we who work in the field owe her an enormous debt of gratitude. It's not her fault that the mainstream media continue to this day to mis-represent and mis-interpret her amazing writings, and her willingness to LISTEN to her patients who were dying. In fact, it was her presentation, her work and her book, On Death and Dying, that inspired me to work in hospice and eventually to become a grief counselor. ❤️

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31 minutes ago, MartyT said:

Elisabeth was a giant in her day. I had the privilege of seeing and hearing her in person at Ferris State University when I was on the faculty there, way back in 1969. She brought death and dying out of the darkness and into the light, and we who work in the field owe her an enormous debt of gratitude. It's not her fault that the mainstream media continue to this day to mis-represent and mis-interpret her amazing writings, and her willingness to LISTEN to her patients who were dying. In fact, it was her presentation, her work and her book, On Death and Dying, that inspired me to work in hospice and eventually to become a grief counselor. ❤️

Wow, new information that I did not know. Kind of underscores the difference in generations I suppose, as I was a babe in 1969. That's amazing that she brought death hand dying into the light. It seems strange that it would be taboo to talk about it, but if it was not well understood that makes sense. How amazing that her work, her book and you hearing her presentation in person was the inspiration for your career path. Love that ❤️ Thx for the learning moment Marty.

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On 11/11/2022 at 2:34 PM, MartyT said:

it was her presentation, her work and her book, On Death and Dying, that inspired me to work in hospice and eventually to become a grief counselor. ❤️

Wow!!  I never knew that!  It's not that she wrote incorrectly but that people misapplied it, IMO.

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