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Death And The Afterlife: Perspectives From Both Sides Of The Veil

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JOURNEYING THROUGH DEATH AND BEYOND

A doctor, a theologian, a psychic medium, and an astral traveler walk into a bar…

Well, it's not actually a bar, it's Beyond Words Presents, and the doctor, theologian, medium, and astral traveler are noted experts in conscious dying and afterlife research. Reverend Terri Daniel will be moderating this fascinating discussion with Karen Wyatt MD, an expert in end-of-life care; William Buhlman, a pioneer in out-of-body exploration; and acclaimed psychic medium John Holland. Each will share their views on what happens when we die, what happens afterward, and how we can visit the afterlife through meditation and astral projection techniques.

Tune TODAY, Wednesday, April 1st at 1 pm Pacific/4 pm Eastern.

Pre-register for the event at this link: http://www.beyondword.com/presents

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Just finished watching this informative discussion on dying and the afterlife. This is a discussion that I now need to have several people enter our own discussion about what was talked about. I want my own discussion to share ideas on experiencing non-linear time, shared death experiences, OBE (out of body experiences), does drugging affect the soul of the dying person, do people on the other side really know when it is our time to pass, is there always someone from the other side that helps us cross, and why is it that hospice people don't talk about spirituality unless asked specifically by the dying person or family.

The panel was truly knowledgeable in conscious dying and afterlife.

I'm glad I listened and I like the idea of having 'an afterlife department' for those dying.

Thanks for sharing this panel with us Marty.

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I think what I got out of it the most was that they don't have to pass alone and can receive reassurance that everything is okay. I think they covered that drugs do not affect the soul of the dying person but it could affect communication.

I wasn't able to be there as George passed (^&%$!@!) due to being evicted from the hospital room while they worked on him and it's always haunted me that that right was taken away from me. It's assuring to know that he wasn't alone, perhaps his mother ushered him to the other side.

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Later --- I just discovered,when I returned to the link to make sure I could not listen--- that all I needed to do was register, and now I have access. Life is good. :)

Well, rats! I missed it, but I see they have a broadcast every Wednesday, and I am so noting on my calendar. Thank you Marty. I am sorry I missed it.

I spent Doug's last night talking with him, reassuring him, and singing to him. I know each of us treasure those last hours.

***And Kay? I know you and George have more than made up for that momentary absence with all the love that keeps passing between you all the time. No one can separate your spirits. :) Be done with haunting, dear heart. {{{hugs}}} ***

Doug's favorite brother, father, and best friend Jim came for him. I saw them. :) I had told him they were waiting for him. And they came. It was a very beautiful time.

Well, I'd better go forage for tissues and then brush my teeth. I have felt so loved today from so many dear hearts. I am incredibly blessed.

Sweet dreams and a beautiful morning to us all.

:wub:

fae

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In his blog post today entitled Last Words, dear Kay, widower and author Mark Liebenow shares an exercise that you might consider trying too. Like your precious George, his wife Evelyn died suddenly of a heart attack, and they never got to say goodbye to each other. He's always wondered what went through her mind when she knew she was dying, just as you may wonder what George was thinking and feeling while you were kept apart from him as he lay dying. Mark decided to write what Evelyn might have said to him, if only she had been able to do so. What do you think George would have said to you (or you to him) if you had been given that opportunity?

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I have done that, not in writing, but in thoughts...George and I did have a keen faith in each other that always tided us over when we were apart, but Sat. night before he died, the heart surgeon had delivered some very hard news to him about his heart, I think then he knew he was going to die and was grappling with it. He didn't want to call his daughter back and that was not like him, he always took any opportunity to talk with her! I insisted and am so glad I did because it was the only time she said "I love you, Dad." and I'm glad he didn't miss out on that...or her either. But he was not himself that night and he jumped on me for not being there (after telling me not to come), also not like him, he never got onto me about anything! He told me he would have walked on broken glass around the world for me, and I just said, "I know you would, George." I didn't argue with him or try to reason with him, he wasn't in that state of mind, I just acknowledged his feelings, which under the circumstances, I could understand. He was struggling with his own mortality. I remembered my mom saying when my dad had heart trouble he'd get cranky and my dad was the most mellow person you ever met, always even tempered and happy. So I kept that in mind. But still, combined with not being able to be there with him when he actually passed, it makes me feel like I let him down and hope he didn't think I didn't come through for him.

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Kay,

I think that Marty makes a good point with the writing, and I have found that when I write to Doug, my thoughts become clearer and I am able to express on paper what I could not sort out in my mind or heart.

I think anyone gets a little crazy when they are facing the unknown. Doug was a little crabby the last night, but it seemed more impatience than anger. He was ready to go, and was disappointed in his family, but I don't think he ever yelled at me. He did yell at other people around us at that time, including one poor hospice worker.

I am sure George did not feel you let him down. Try writing about it. Sometimes the action of pushing a pen or pencil across the paper also helps us to release emotional energy from our bodies, and sometimes we are releasing of stuff we did not even know was there!

I got your snow, about 2 inches I think, so far. It is still snowing a bit off and on, and I have a good fire going on the lower level. :) I like the cozy feel of the wood fire, and the beauty of the flames. :)

Sending lots of love your way, and wishes for a lovely day.

*<twinkles>*

fae

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George never yelled at me either.

They're still predicting snow, today through the next week and beyond, but so far, no sign of it. I have a lot of upcoming driving to do so it makes me nervous.

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Oh Kay. you and me both. I wasn't there when Pete died. He was in a nursing home and I was supporting our daughter as she gave birth. He died and afterwards I couldn't bring myself to ask the circumstances. Whether he was alone, how it happened, (I know it was an onset of pneumonia bfought on by his respiratory problems), if he knew he was dying, if he wanted me there, so many hard questions and I deliberatly didn't ask them because I knew that any one of them could have been answered by what would cause me pain for the rest of my life.

I know that he died and that he wouldn't want me to feel any greater pain than I already do. So I never asked. Maybe I would have been told things which would have helped me? Maybe not. But it's something I hardly ever visit willingly. It's just so hard. We shared our lives for 50 years and we should have been together. And the only thing that I would have left him for (and of course I didn't know he would die then) was because our daughter (a single mother) needed me. But if I'd known he would die I would never have left him. I've always put Pete above everyone. Even our children. But I didn't know.

I know QMary had the same pain of not being there, and you, Kay, and me. And it's so hard. But I also know that our beloved spouses would understand totally and not want us to suffer because of this. If I wrote it down addressed to Pete I know he would say "please my Lovie, don't worry. I understood why you weren't there". But it's still almost too hard to bear, even now, three years later.

Jan

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Oh, Jan, I am just so touched by our words. You have found such beautiful ways to make peace for yourself, and to hold your love. Peace to your heart, dear one.

feralfae

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I don't think about it as much as I used to but it still bugs me, I guess it always will, how could it not? Even though I know he'd be the first to forgive & understand, it's just how we were with each other. Mitch has had to face this too as Tammy was loaded into an ambulance and he had to separately drive to the hospital, getting held up in traffic, then we he gets there finds she was "unresponsive"? It's just hard.

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Did any of you listen to the video Marty posted the link on? I did find it comforting, that these people who deal with the dying all the time (some hospice care) or experts about the subject, assured us there is always someone ushering them in to their new non-physical life. If I couldn't be there, at least I know someone was and someone was giving George and Pete and Tammy that assurance.

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I just listened to the video recording and I cannot say a lot right now as I'm in tears ... I would have asked "what about husbands and wives? Will we be together?" what about if you were married more than 1 time and divorced ... how does that work? The workshop gave new meaning to why Ric kept talking about the Celestine Prophecy (soul groups - in the 10th insight) and "higher vibratory" somethings.

I don't want to get obsessive with the afterlife but I need to know :-( I don't know if that makes sense. I also like Karen's comment that grief/bereavement creates a crack in the heart ...

Thank you Marty for sharing

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It's my understanding that all who are in heaven will be together, but it must be a big place to accommodate us all! I would imagine since things are made perfect that husbands/wives who have divorced will have a different perspective when they've passed through that veil and the wrongs have been forgiven and moved on from. We who have had special relationships and lost that loved one that meant the world to us will be reunited for eternity. There have been many books written about the afterlife and I'm sure different people vary as to their beliefs, but I can't help but feel that what is true for you...is true. We will no longer be limited by our finite bodies that give way to age and disease, for that will be no more.

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Thank you to all of you that have posted here.  

I need to feel the hope of being together again, it is a desperate need.   I am hesitant to research the topic, I'm fearful that because he took his own life there will only be more sorrow...  Can someone gently tell me if there is any hope?

I feel that I failed Gord in life because I didn't give him all the love I had for him.  My fear of being hurt caused me to hold back my real feelings of love, perhaps this is why he decided to die...   I was so afraid he would leave me and I would be broken hearted.  I was so stupid to think that he couldn't hurt me if he didn't know he had my whole heart.  

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My dear, as I've written elsewhere, it seems to me that if we human beings are capable of understanding why someone we love dearly would be so depressed as to see suicide as the only option, that certainly God in His infinite wisdom would be far more understanding and forgiving of that act than we are. There is a terrible stigma surrounding this matter of suicide, and while we can never fully know what may have driven your beloved to take his own life, we certainly can learn more about the illness of depression and the effects it can have on a person's ability to make healthy choices.

In another post I recommended these articles and related resources, and I hope you will take some time to explore them too:

Surviving A Spouse's Death by Suicide

Grief Support for Survivors of Suicide

Grief and The Burden of Guilt

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Thank you Marty.

I am still suffering the befuddled mind and I can not find the bookmarks for the previous post.  I'm not even confident I can find that post again.  Your patience and support are so appreciated by me.

I have redone the bookmarks and they are where I can find them now.  There is so much information when we know where to look.  I'm going through a grief storm right now but it helps to know that there are periods of calm weather too.

Thank you for everything.

Marita

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Marita, my dear, if you need help in finding something, just say so. We understand, and we will do all we can to help you find your way through that grief storm. I just read an article by Annette Childs that warmed my heart, and I hope it will do the same for you: Rx For The Soul: Church 

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I worked for a family that had been close friends of mine for many many years and their son, whom I also worked with, commit suicide.  They had people say inappropriate things to them that were very unsettling, so they got counseling and it really helped them in understanding that Bobby was finally at rest and yes that we can look forward to being together again.  I hope you find a counselor that can put your mind at ease as well.  

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June 1-4, 2017  - 
Portland, OR.
 
A reminder to our friends and followers... 
 
The earlybird discount for our 2017 Afterlife Conference
ends on November 30.
 
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Questions?
Contact us:
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